Chris' Chili Quest

I love random things, and Youtube is a great place to see lots of them. One day my curiosity led me to some videos of people eating super-hot chili peppers. Over time I became so fascinated by this that I decided to try it myself, starting at the bottom of the heat scale and working my way up. This blog, which originated as wall posts on Facebook, chronicles my chili adventures. Enjoy!
Mystery Pepper #1 Review
I’ll just say right now that I’m pretty sure they are arbols.  I’m actually happy about that, because after being fairly disappointed about the dried variety, I wanted to give fresh arbols a shot at redemption.  I ate 2 red ones, and I was not disappointed. 
The 2nd chili turned out to be fairly hotter than the 1st.  (I actually got the hiccups again!  Not sure what causes that when you eat a pepper, but it’s interesting.)  I’m pretty sure I got the full scoville potential on these fresh arbols, which was nice after the relatively-mild dried versions.  The heat peaked very fast, but also began to fade fast.  Very acute burn on my tongue and the roof of my mouth.  Towards the end it had that feeling like my tongue was actually burnt.  But the peak heat lasted only 5 minutes or so, then began to slowly fade.
As I sat taking in the arbols, I could clearly see why they are used mostly in a dried form.  They are small, thin, and not at all fleshy.  Once the chili matures to a red color, the skin is already edging toward ‘tough’…not an enjoyable chili to eat.  It does have respectable heat though, and great color when dried.

Mystery Pepper #1 Review

I’ll just say right now that I’m pretty sure they are arbols.  I’m actually happy about that, because after being fairly disappointed about the dried variety, I wanted to give fresh arbols a shot at redemption.  I ate 2 red ones, and I was not disappointed. 

The 2nd chili turned out to be fairly hotter than the 1st.  (I actually got the hiccups again!  Not sure what causes that when you eat a pepper, but it’s interesting.)  I’m pretty sure I got the full scoville potential on these fresh arbols, which was nice after the relatively-mild dried versions.  The heat peaked very fast, but also began to fade fast.  Very acute burn on my tongue and the roof of my mouth.  Towards the end it had that feeling like my tongue was actually burnt.  But the peak heat lasted only 5 minutes or so, then began to slowly fade.

As I sat taking in the arbols, I could clearly see why they are used mostly in a dried form.  They are small, thin, and not at all fleshy.  Once the chili matures to a red color, the skin is already edging toward ‘tough’…not an enjoyable chili to eat.  It does have respectable heat though, and great color when dried.

  1. chiliquestchris posted this